Saturday, February 24, 2007

Number 660 - Crosby Stills & Nash




Number 660

Crosby Stills & Nash

"Southern Cross"

(1982)
.
Genre:Rock
The musical partnership of David Crosby (born August 14, 1941), Stephen Stills (born January 3, 1945), and Graham Nash (born February 2, 1942), with and without Neil Young (born November 12, 1945), was not only one of the most successful touring and recording acts of the late '60s, '70s, and early '80s -- with the colorful, contrasting nature of the members' characters and their connection to the political and cultural upheavals of the time -- it was the only American-based band to approach the overall societal impact of the Beatles. The group was a second marriage for all the participants when it came together in 1968: Crosby had been a member of , Nash was in the Hollies, and Stills had been part of Buffalo Springfield.

The resulting trio, however, sounded like none of its predecessors and was characterized by a unique vocal blend and a musical approach that ranged from acoustic folk to melodic pop to hard rock. CSN's debut album, released in 1969, was perfectly in tune with the times, and the group was an instant hit. By the time of their first tour (which included the Woodstock festival), they had added Young, also a veteran of Buffalo Springfield, who maintained a solo career. The first CSNY album, Déjà Vu, was a chart-topping hit in 1970, but the group split acrimoniously after a summer tour. Four Way Street, a live double album issued after the breakup, was another number one hit. (When it was finally released on CD in 1992, it was lengthened with more live material.)

In 1974, CSNY reformed for a summer stadium tour without releasing a new record. Nevertheless, the compilation So Far became their third straight number one. Crosby, Stills & Nash re-formed without Young in 1977 for the album CSN, another giant hit. They followed with Daylight Again in 1982, but by then Crosby was in the throes of drug addiction and increasing legal problems. He was in jail in 1985-1986, but cleaned up and returned to action, with the result that CSNY reunited for only their second studio album, American Dream, in 1988. CSN followed with Live It Up in 1990, and though that album was a commercial disappointment, the trio remained a popular live act; it embarked on a 25th anniversary tour in the summer of 1994 and released a new album, After the Storm. The trio again reunited with Young for 1999's Looking Forward, followed in 2000 by their CSNY2K tour. ~ William Ruhlmann

For Neil Young see Number 938 & Number 677

What does Rolling Stone think about CSN?
First, last and always, there is the blend. The way the three voices fit together remains one of the most singular and pleasing harmonic fusions in all of rock. And that is why, when the solo careers of , and have been on the skids for years, they can reunite and create a whole that is much more than the sum of its parts.
No other California harmony group could claim such a spiritual mystique. The California dreaming presupposed a voluptuary paradise of hot-blooded teenyboppers. The Beach Boys' playground of little deuce coupes and perfect waves, for all its glimpses into the great beyond, was sun-scorched and physically intense. And even , CSN's most distinguished heirs, remained sullen sensualists brooding about the failure of pleasure to make them happy.
Those who enjoy just drifting along on sweet nothings will enjoy Daylight Again, CSN's dreamiest, most opaque album. Of its eleven songs – three by Nash, one by Crosby, six by Stills with various collaborators and one by Craig Doerge and Judy Henske–not a single one gives us a hard look at what any of them has been doing in the last five years. Nash's diaphanous "Wasted on the Way" is a wistful daydream about "so much water moving underneath the bridge." In "Delta," Crosby ruminates about "the running rivers of choice and chance." And Stills, in yet another voyage song, "Southern Cross," sings of "dreams a-dying."
Fittingly, Stills' title song, gorgeously rendered by the trio and Art Garfunkel, is both an epitaph and a longing for extinction, for "Armageddon's side" and "a valley covered with bones." In Daylight Again, the blend has turned into a ghostly choir sighing over lives that have all the urgency of an afterthought. (RS 376) STEPHEN HOLDEN
For Art Garfunkel see Number 682
For The Beach Boys see Number 714 & Number 641
Crowbarreds choice for Website to find more on CSN ... Click on the address http://starling.rinet.ru/music/csn.htm
Rolling Stone Top 500 Songs ranked this song at Number (Seriously, 1982 was way past their expiry date) and the Album ranked at Number (Jury is still out)
This song has a crowbarred rating of 70.1 out of 108 pts

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